A New Chapter: The Literary City Podcast Embraces The Radio Waves on IndigoMusic.com

In a noteworthy development for literature enthusiasts, The Literary City Podcast has forged a strategic partnership with IndigoMusic.com. This collaboration aims to significantly amplify the podcast’s reach and connect with a wider audience on a global scale. The podcast will take on the airwaves on IndigoMusic.com every Saturday at noon, with the option to tune in at 91.9FM in Bangalore and Goa.

Ramjee Chandran, a journalist and wordsmith, has been holding down the fort as the Editor of Explocity, a slick fortnightly mag, since ’98. And get this – in 2022, Chandran rolled out The Literary City with Ramjee Chandran. Talk about a cool move!

MytHistory - Bangalore International Centre

The podcast’s expansion into the radio domain through IndigoMusic.com signifies a significant stride, amplifying its influence beyond the digital realm. This segment on 91.9 FM will serve as a cornerstone for book enthusiasts and cultural connoisseurs. What can you expect? Well, insightful dialogues with authors and explorations of diverse literary themes.

Also read: https://bangalore.explocity.com/articles/the-literary-city-podcast-teams-up-with-indigomusiccom-for-radio-collaboration/

In its first episode, Ramjee Chandran, the host of The Literary City, engaged in a profound discussion with Shrabani Basu, an accomplished Indian journalist, historian, and author. The focal point of their conversation was Basu’s book ‘Victoria & Abdul: The True Story of the Queen’s Closest Confidant’ (2010), which delves into the historical narrative of the friendship shared between Queen Victoria and Abdul Karim. The discourse was conducted with a formal and scholarly demeanour, shedding light on the genuine nature of the bond between the monarch and her confidant. They also spoke about her recent book ‘The Mystery of the Parsee Lawyer: Arthur Conan Doyle, George Edalji and the case of the foreigner in the English village’ (2021).

Back in 1983, Shrabani kicked off her journalism hustle as a trainee journalist with The Times of India in Mumbai. Fast forward to ’87, and she jetted off to London, bringing her A-game to the scene by contributing to the Anandabazar Patrika and The Telegraph, both straight outta Calcutta. For more check out the podcast below.

Queen Victoria's passion for learning Urdu at such a late stage in her life  was remarkable: Shrabani Basu - Times of India

Image Courtesy: timesofindia

This collaboration signifies a significant development in the literary landscape, fostering wider engagement with literature and enriching the cultural sphere for listeners worldwide.

Listen to the podcast below.

–Silviya.Y

loader